Presentations and Project Showcase Submissions

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2018 Fall Presentations
Over Coming the Skills Gap through Effective Training Programs
2018 Fall Presentations

Panel Moderator: Christopher Perego

Panel Members: Doug DeSilvio, The George D. Alan Company; Frank Halsey, Mid-Continental Restoration Company; Ron Pilla, Valcourt Building Services LLC; and Stace Grund, Tatley-Grund, Inc.

Turnover. Lack of experience. Changing materials and codes.  Learn how the above-mentioned panel members are dealing with these challenges through effective training programs. 


2018 Fall Presentations
Demystifying Historical Preservation – Panel moderated by Sarah Holder, PROSOCO, Inc.
2018 Fall Presentations

Panel Members: Brett Laureys, WJE; Larry Burkhardt, Conproco; Dan Tyler and Tom Murphy, Pullman

What does it mean if a building is designated as historic? This presentation will provide an overview of the National Register of Historic Places program and some of the national preservation regulations/ standards that determine what can be done on each historic property. These regulatory and compliance components are often seen as hindrances; and, if not addressed on the front end of the project, can drastically slow down work.  This session will include examples of local preservation laws and state regulations on historic properties. The local and state level can vary drastically, but each local law will include some key concepts that the SWR Institute membership will likely find helpful.


2018 Fall Presentations
Legal Pitfalls in Repair and Restoration Business, A Construction Lawyer's Viewpoint
2018 Fall Presentations

Josh Leavitt, Much Shelist (Attorney)

Construction defect litigation is prevalent in the construction industry.  Contractors and subcontractors can be named as defendants in construction defect litigation, even when their work had little or no substantial impact on the issues at hand.  Construction defect litigation can take years to be resolved through the legal system, although often in less time if alternative dispute methods are used.  Nevertheless, during the dispute process, regardless of the method utilized, the parties' resources can be severely taxed posing many challenges to their businesses.  In this presentation, a recognized construction lawyer experienced in defect disputes shares his experience with over 30 years of experience in cases involving construction defects, and also discusses the pitfalls and risks associated with performing repair work to correct someone else’s mistakes.  The presentation will include a discussion of risk mitigation strategies.


2018 Fall Presentations
Untangling the Rope Descent System Regulations recently revised by OSHA
2018 Fall Presentations

Stefan Bright, Valcourt Building Services LLC and IWCA Safety Director

OSHA has spent the last 25 years developing and upgrading regulations for fall protection and falling object protection for general industry.  These regulations include a section addressing the use of rope descending systems on buildings throughout the United States.   Titled 1910.27, the rope descent system regulations require compliance from the user of the equipment as well as the owner of the building where the equipment is being used.  This is a critical requirement which will elevate the level of safety for those who use ropes for building access and façade work.  The professional window cleaning industry is the foremost user of this type of equipment, but many other trades have followed suit because of its transportability and ease of use.  Stefan Bright has spent most of his career working on the development of safety and training programs, as well as National Industry Standards which specifically address this type of building access equipment.


2018 Fall Presentations
For the Next 200 Years: Stone and Metal Preservation at the US Capitol
2018 Fall Presentations

Mary Oehrlein, Historic Preservation Officer Architect of the Capitol

A technical review of the materials and technologies used in completing the Phase I cleaning, repair and conservation of the building and sculpture marble and granite including documentation; water and chemical, laser, poultice, and micro-abrasion cleaning; mortar/grout, epoxy, and acrylic repair; pinning repair and new carving/Dutchman installation; stone consolidation; metals cleaning and finishing; and replication of historic light fixtures.


2018 Fall Presentations
Reducing Cost of Rigging on Difficult Access Projects without Sacrificing Safety
2018 Fall Presentations

Jim Dougherty and Clint Ramberg, Spider  

Learn how to determine the best access solution pre-bid and how to identify site conditions that limit your access choices.  During this presentation, you’ll also find out how to utilize new safety products to maintain or increase productivity without sacrificing safety.  


2018 Fall Presentations
Kreiger Hall Waterproofing Repairs: A Case Study
2018 Fall Presentations

Many commercial and institutional buildings outlast the effective life of their original below-grade waterproofing systems. They suffer from water infiltration, which can deteriorate building components and disrupt building operations. In these instances, owners face a choice to conduct repairs to manage water infiltration at the interior or prevent water infiltration from the outside of the building. Interior water management can be successful at collecting water infiltration and limiting some damage but does not stop leak and water-related foundation wall deterioration. Some owners require the reliability of exterior-applied replacement below grade waterproofing to meet building use or service life requirements. 


2018 Fall Presentations
Woolworth Building: How Digital Technology Works with Historic Restoration
2018 Fall Presentations

John Krouse, Boston Valley Terra Cotta.

This presentation will focus on the terra cotta restoration of the Woolworth Building in New York City. The discussion with focus on the challenges of surveying the building with the complexity of all the unique styles in a small timeframe. There will also be a focus on how the use of digital technology enhanced the surveying and production process of such unique pieces.


2018 Fall Presentations
The Multiple Impacts of Restoration: Recent findings from US Cities
2018 Fall Presentations

The rehabilitation and restoration of existing buildings – particularly those of historic character – has traditionally been advocated on cultural and aesthetic grounds. Recent studies, however, particularly at the city level, have demonstrated a much broader range of benefits, including economic, environmental, and social. This presentation will look at analyses from Savannah, San Antonio, Indianapolis, New York City and elsewhere that revealed measurable, positive benefits from building restoration and the policies that support it.


2017 Fall Presentations
Project on Parade - 1611 Telegraph
2017 Fall Presentations

Project on Parade - 1611 Telegraph
Nick Marcano


2017 Fall Presentations
Project on Parade - Carolinas Hospital - Florence SC
2017 Fall Presentations

Project on Parade - Carolinas Hospital
Jeff Gontarek


2017 Fall Presentations
Project on Parade - Gunnison Chapel at St. Lawerence University
2017 Fall Presentations

Project on Parade - Gunnison Chapel at St. Lawerence University
Scott Lupini


2017 Fall Presentations
Project on Parade - Broadway Lofts
2017 Fall Presentations

Project on Parade - Broadway Lofts
Jim Rowe


2017 Fall Presentations
A Rapidly Changing Climate: Threat – and Opportunity
2017 Fall Presentations

Paul Douglas, Total Weather, LLC
For over 20 years I’ve been seeing the symptoms of a warmer, wetter, more volatile climate showing up in the weather patterns above Minnesota, the nation and the planet. I started connecting the dots, publicly, in the late 90s, before Al Gore came out with his documentary on climate change. There is compelling data - multiple strands of evidence – confirming a planetary warming trend is now well underway. CO2 levels are higher than they’ve been in at least 3 million years, a time when sea level was 75 feet higher than today. Is this just a natural cycle; how can we be sure it’s man-made this time? Where is the evidence?

The climate is changing, it’s us – and there are solutions. A disruptive, clean energy revolution will gradually, methodically wean us off the fossil fuels responsible for the bulk of the warming we see all around us. More Americans will get on board, as solar, wind, energy storage and countless other new, clean technologies provide more energy, at less cost, with far fewer unpleasant side effects. Climate volatility and weather disruption will continue to increase. Everything we create will have to be more resilient, storm-resistant, flood-tolerant and drought-proof; from how we design our cities, build our homes, repair our roads to how we grow our crops. There will be dislocation, but Minnesota will make out considerably better than most of the United States, for a variety of reasons. Solutions won’t come from Big Government, but from the markets - entrepreneurs inventing new, carbon-free ways to keep the lights on, the economy powered up and people employed. The world isn’t ending, it’s warming. That brings benefits and risk, threats and opportunities. There’s no time for gloom and doom. The situation isn’t hopeless – and we aren’t helpless.


2017 Fall Presentations
OSHA’s Crystalline Silica Rule – What You Need to Know
2017 Fall Presentations

Deborah Green, Certifi ed Industrial Hygienist,
ATC Group Services LLC

Learn how to keep your workers safe and reduce your liability when working with silica. Find out what you will need to know to comply with the “Occupational Exposure to Crystalline Silica in Construction” rule that OSHA started enforcing on Sept. 23, 2017.


2017 Fall Presentations
Bad Weather! Now What? – Weather Mitigation Panel
2017 Fall Presentations

Peter Vorhees, Everest Waterproofing & Restoration, Inc.
Scott Lupini, Lupini Construction, Inc.
Michael Bernhard, Metro Caulking & Waterproofing LLC
David Gladney, Cardinal Roofing & Restoration, Inc.

Learn how a panel of industry professionals monitor and adapt to the ever-changing weather to ensure continued progression of their projects and crews.


2017 Fall Presentations
The Business Case for Culture
2017 Fall Presentations

Laurie Baedke, Advisor and Consultant and Tim McGill, Jr. – McGill Restoration
What the heck is culture and why does it matter? This practical and interactive presentation explores the connection between employee engagement, performance and safety. We’ll look at research on what drives employee engagement. And, we’ll open the playbook from one company who invested in culture branding and is reaping the competitive advantage of a thriving culture, aggressive growth and powerful business rewards.


2017 Fall Presentations
Conventional and Non-Convention Repair of Curtain Wall Systems
2017 Fall Presentations

Kami Farahmanpour, Building Technology Consultants
A case history involving non-conventional repairs to a large commercial building curtain wall system will be presented. These nonconventional repairs included retrofi tting the curtain wall system with new custom-extruded external pressure bars and caps to address several issues, correcting displaced mullions, and replacing mechanical louvers integrated into the curtain wall system. The repairs also included overcladding the feature panels between curtain walls sections with a new system that incorporated an air and waterresistive barrier, and a drainage plane. The implementation of the project posed several challenges including staging, lead times for custom extrusions and requirements for mock-ups and working on an occupied offi ce building. During construction, some of the pre-fi nished custom extrusions were found to be inadequately coated, causing 
delays in completing the project.


2017 Fall Presentations
Adaptive Re-use and Restoration of the old Childs’ Restaurant, Coney Island, NY
2017 Fall Presentations

Dan Tyler, Pullman SST, Inc., Yasmine Elrashidy, Pullman SST, Inc., & Diane Kaese, Kaese & Lynch Architecture and Engineering
Pre-Construction started in the fall of 2014. The amphitheater and park opened in the summer of 2016. The remaining restaurant dining room opened in spring of 2017. However, it wasn’t all that easy.  The building was constructed in 1923 and landmarked in 2002.  The building is significant for both its social history related to the restaurant/service industry as well as its magnificent terra cotta ornament. It has endured over 90 years of changing tides of man and Mother Nature.  This left the building with deteriorated masonry and steel as well as asbestos, biological growth and other man-made changes.  Restrictions on access to the site narrowed investigation options prior to construction. Replacement materials were specified generically and confirmed after the actual conditions were assessed.  Luckily, construction didn’t yield many physical surprises but rather endless scheduling and supply challenges.  The project team took both traditional and non-traditional approaches to address the numerous challenges presented to complete the project.


2017 Fall Presentations
Projects on Parade
2017 Fall Presentations

Kelly McBride
This is a new type of presentation offered at our meetings where several different companies will show a few details and photos from one of their projects.  Although these project highlights are not as in-depth as the 45-minute presentations, there will still be valuable information shared that should stimulate interest, questions and answers.   


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The Business Case for Culture